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Showing posts from April, 2019

What Active Ingredients To Look For In A Senior Horse Feed Balancer

In this article I might want to impart to you some helpful data about what explicit dynamic fixings to search for in a senior steed feed balancer.

The truth of the matter is that these days there are several unique sorts of feed balancers and feed balancer definitions. Some are explicitly detailed for the necessities of overweight steeds, some are planned for underweight ponies, there are some that have raised degrees of dynamic fixings and are figured for execution steeds lastly there are those that are explicitly defined for veteran and senior ponies.

The truth of the matter is that all ponies get old and simply like with us, people, age gets a change dietary needs. More seasoned ponies that are never again taking an interest in focused pony riding disciplines and that have generally low remaining tasks at hand have totally unique healthful needs from steeds that contend in showjumping rivalries consistently. Notwithstanding this they are progressively inclined to create joint issue…

Watchful waiting reasonable for patients with diabetic macular edema and good vision

During the 2-year study, the detection of 2 lines of visual acuity loss at one visit or 1 line of visual acuity loss at two consecutive visits prompted aflibercept injections to be given to the people in the laser or observation groups.Brooksie Beard
People with good vision despite having center-involved diabetic macular edema can safely forego immediate treatment of their eye condition as long as they are closely monitored, and treatment begins promptly if vision worsens, according to clinical trial results. The findings are published online today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
The study was conducted by the DRCR Retina Network (link is external) a multicenter clinical research network funded by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
Diabetic macular edema is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetic eye disease in the United States. Diabetes can result in the development of leaky blood vessels in…

Daily folic acid supplement may reduce risk of gestational diabetes N

Taking a folic acid supplement daily before pregnancy may reduce the risk of gestational, or pregnancy-related, diabetes, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions. The findings appear in Diabetes Care.
Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate, or vitamin B9, which is found in leafy green vegetables, nuts, peas, beans and other foods. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends (link is external) that all women of reproductive age take a daily supplement containing 400 to 800 micrograms of folic acid to reduce the risk of conceiving a child with a neural tube defect, a class of birth defects affecting the brain and spinal cord.
Gestational diabetes results when the level of blood sugar, or glucose, rises too high. It increases a woman’s chances for cesarean delivery and for blood pressure disorders during pregnancy. It also raises the risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes later in life. For infants, …

Education may be key to a healthier, wealthier US

According to the United States Department of Education, the U.S. high school graduation rate will reach an all-time high this year, which is good news for both our economy and health. Policy makers often use education policy to strengthen the workforce and boost earnings, productivity and employment. But earning a diploma may also lead to a longer, healthier life.
A new study from the University of Colorado Denver is the first to estimate the economic value of education for better health and longevity.
The study finds that the reduced disability and longer lives among the more educated are worth up to twice as much as the value of education for lifetime earnings.
The study, "The Economic Value of Education for Longer Lives and Reduced Disability," was published in The Milbank Quarterly.
"We often think about health insurance access or medical procedures, like mammography or colonoscopy, as the most important drivers of health," s…

Being a car commuter with obesity linked to a 32% increased death risk

New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity in Glasgow, Scotland (28 April - 1 May) shows that individuals with obesity who commute by car have a 32% higher risk of death, from any cause, compared with those individuals with a normal weight and commute via cycling and walking. The study is by Edward Toke-Bjolgerud, University of Glasgow, UK, and colleagues.
Previous work, using UK Biobank data, has shown that active commuting, mainly cycling, was associated with a 50% lower risk of death, from any cause, and heart disease compared to car commuting. Since 57% of men and 66% of women in the UK are overweight or obese -- a condition linked with a range of poor health outcomes -- the authors of this new research aimed to investigate how different modes of active commuting (car, cycling, walking, mixed-mode) might alter the association between obesity and adverse health outcomes.
Their analysis includes 163,149 UK Biobank participants who have been fo…

Stressed at work and trouble sleeping? It's more serious than you think E

Work stress and impaired sleep are linked to a threefold higher risk of cardiovascular death in employees with hypertension. That's the finding of research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1
Study author Professor Karl-Heinz Ladwig, of the German Research Centre for Environmental Health and the Medical Faculty, Technical University of Munich, said: "Sleep should be a time for recreation, unwinding, and restoring energy levels. If you have stress at work, sleep helps you recover. Unfortunately poor sleep and job stress often go hand in hand, and when combined with hypertension the effect is even more toxic."
One-third of the working population has hypertension (high blood pressure). Previous research has shown that psychosocial factors have a stronger detrimental effect on individuals with pre-existing cardiovascular risks than on healthy people. This was the first study …

Morning exercise can improve decision-making across the day in older adults S

A study of older Australians has found a morning bout of moderate-intensity exercise improves cognitive performance like decision-making across the day compared to prolonged sitting without exercise.
Furthermore, the study showed that a morning bout of exercise combined with brief light-intensity walking breaks to frequently disrupt sitting throughout an 8-hour day can boost your short-term memory compared to uninterrupted sitting, according to the study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
The 'Brain Breaks' study, led by the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute and The University of Western Australia, also shows that the distinct responses in cognitive performance to exercise versus exercise and sitting breaks point to different patterns of physical activity being able to enhance distinct aspects of cognition.
The study of more than 65 males and females aged 55 - 80 years examined the effects of acute morning exercise on a treadmill with and wit…

Despite health risks, energy drink consumption in the United States has increased substantially over the past decade among adolescents, young adults, and middle-aged adults

According to a new study appearing in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, energy drink consumption in the United States has increased substantially over the past decade among adolescents, young adults, and middle-aged adults. Energy drink consumers had significantly higher total caffeine intake compared with non-consumers and the beverages represented a majority of their total daily caffeine. While the findings indicate that daily intake among adolescents and middle-aged adults may be leveling off and overall use across all groups is relatively limited, use by young adults continues to steadily rise.
"The increasing use of energy drinks, especially among young adults, is cause for concern and warrants continued study and surveillance," explained senior author Sara N. Bleich, PhD, Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. "Although the beverages are marketed to redu…

More intensive blood pressure therapy helps patients with type 2 diabetes regardless of cardiovascular risk

People with type 2 diabetes who received intensive treatment to keep their blood pressure levels at 130/80 mm/Hg or below had fewer heart attacks, strokes and other diabetes complications, according to a study published in the American Heart Association's journal Hypertension. These patients also had lower overall risk of dying from any cause--a benefit that was observed regardless of a person's preexisting cardiovascular risk and baseline blood pressure, the research shows.
The findings shed new light on optimal blood-pressure targets and could help reconcile conflicting guidelines for the treatment for hypertension in people with type 2 diabetes--the more common form of the disease affecting more than 420 million people worldwide.
"Our findings demonstrate a benefit of more intensive therapy aiming for blood pressure thresholds at 130/80 or below and should help resolve some ongoing confusion over optimal blood pressure targets for people with diabetes,&q…

Following a healthy plant-based diet may lower kidney disease risk A

A new study has uncovered a link between plant-based diets and kidney health. The finding, which appears in an upcoming issue of CJASN, indicates that consuming a diet based on nutrient-rich plants may help protect against the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD).

The consumption of plant-based diets is becoming more common for ethical, environmental, and health reasons. The quality of plant sources of food can differ, however, with nutrient-rich plants being more healthful and plants that are high in refined carbohydrates being less healthful.

Emerging evidence suggests that the risk of chronic conditions varies by types of plant-based diets. To evaluate the associations between plant-based diets and the development of CKD in a general population, a team led by Hyunju Kim and Casey M. Rebholz, PhD (Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health) analyzed information on 14,686 middle-aged adults enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.

Among …

Insomniacs unable to get emotional distress off their mind

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IMAGE: Distressing emotional experiences activate limbic brain circuits and the autonomic nervous system. Fortunately, the activation disappears over time. People literally settle the experiences in their head as neutralized memories. Wassing... view more 
Credit: Rick Wassing Cringe-worthy mistakes and embarrassing blunders made today won't seem so bad tomorrow. That is, unless you're an insomniac, research at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience shows. The scientists asked participants to relive their most shameful experiences of decades ago while making MRI scans of their brain activity. While good sleepers literally settled those experiences in their head as neutralized memories, people with insomnia were not able to do so. This breakthrough finding suggests that insomnia could primarily be caused by a failing neutralization of emotional distress. Which makes it understandable that insomnia is the primary risk factor for the development of disorders o…

Peanut allergy oral immunotherapy increases allergic reactions

Despite effectively inducing desensitisation in the clinic, oral immunotherapy for peanut allergies appears to considerably increase allergic and anaphylactic reactions, compared with avoidance or placebo Authors call for safer peanut allergy treatment approaches and rigorous randomised controlled trials, which use more appropriate measures of allergy reduction based on outcomes that patients wantA systematic review including 12 studies with more than 1,000 patients who were followed for a year finds that, compared with allergen avoidance or placebo, current oral immunotherapy treatments result in a large increase in anaphylaxis and other allergic reactions, rather than preventing them as intended.
The findings, published in The Lancet, highlight the gap between outcomes measured in the clinic and the allergy relief outcomes that patients desire after oral immunotherapy for peanut allergy.
Studies of oral immunotherapy currently measure treatment success by whether a t…

Exercise activates memory neural networks in older adults

How quickly do we experience the benefits of exercise? A new University of Maryland study of healthy older adults shows that just one session of exercise increased activation in the brain circuits associated with memory - including the hippocampus - which shrinks with age and is the brain region attacked first in Alzheimer's disease.

"While it has been shown that regular exercise can increase the volume of the hippocampus, our study provides new information that acute exercise has the ability to impact this important brain region," said Dr. J. Carson Smith, an associate professor of kinesiology in the University of Maryland School of Public Health and the study's lead author.

The study is published in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society.
Dr. Smith's research team measured the brain activity (using fMRI) of healthy participants ages 55-85 who were asked to perform a memory task that involves identifying famous names and non …

Healthy aging entails reorganization of function in prefrontal brain areas

Researchers from HSE University and York University have become the first to analyse the results of 82 functional neuroimaging studies on working memory mechanisms in different adult age groups. The meta-analyses showed that across studies the agreement of various areas of the prefrontal cortex decreases with ageing, suggesting reorganization of brain function during healthy aging. The results have been published in the paper 'Meta-analyses of the n-back working memory task: fMRI evidence of age-related changes in prefrontal cortex involvement across the adult lifespan': https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.03.074
Working memory is a system that helps keep information readily available as we use it for performing tasks here and now, including complex intellectual operations such as learning, understanding and reasoning. For example, we use this type of memory to detect and remember the most important things in another person's speech and …

It's OK to indulge once in a while: The body adapts to occasional short-term overeating

Overeating has been found to impair blood sugar (glucose) control and insulin levels. A new study suggests that the duration of a bout of overeating can affect how the body adapts glucose and insulin processing when calorie intake increases. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology--Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Obesity and type 2 diabetes have increased significantly worldwide within the past 30 years. Lifestyle factors such as overindulging in high-calorie foods play a large role in the development of these two serious health conditions. Understanding how overeating causes changes in blood sugar control and insulin processing may help scientists learn more about metabolic disease.

Researchers from Deakin University in Australia studied a small group of healthy, lean men with an average age of 22. Volunteers participated in a short-term trial consisting of five days "indicative of humans overeating during festivals and holidays&q…

How to combine 'leg day' with running

James Cook University scientists in Australia say they have the solution for a problem gym-goers have when they combine endurance and weight training.
JCU's Dr Kenji Doma led the review paper. He said his own work and those of other scientists had previously discovered that resistance training, such as weight lifting, may harm performance in endurance training, such as running, when the two are combined on the same or separate days.
The practice of combining the two is commonly referred to as 'concurrent training'.
"Based on previous evidence, we suspect that if appropriate recovery is not accounted for between each training mode, it may impair endurance development," he said.
Dr Doma said the physiological stress caused by a typical resistance training bout of 40 to 60 minutes can continue for several days post-exercise, as opposed to a full recovery within 24 hours following a typical endurance training bout.
"We wa…

Higher weight increases risk of psoriasis

Risk increases by nine per cent for each increase in whole BMI number 



Studies have linked psoriasis and higher weight, but the causal relationship between the two has been unclear. What triggers what?

Or could other underlying reasons explain the connection?

"Higher BMI may contribute to increased inflammation of the skin, which can exacerbate psoriasis, but it could also be that psoriasis leads to a person being less physically active and thus gaining weight," explains Mari Løset.

She is a medical doctor at the Department of Dermatology at St. Olavs Hospital and a postdoctoral fellow at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) K.G. Jebsen Center for Genetic Epidemiology.

Løset is part of a team that been involved in a study of the causal relationship between BMI and psoriasis.

BMI stands for body mass index and is a measure of body fat content. It is calculated from a person's height and weight.

The observational study is a lar…

A spoonful of peppermint helps the meal go down

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IMAGE: Leaves of the peppermint plant, from which peppermint oil is derived. view more 
Credit: Image from dreamstime.com --Creative Commons Zero (CC0) public domain license. Imagine that while eating a delicious meal at your favorite restaurant, your joy is cut short because of difficulty swallowing your food, followed by chest pain.
If you go see a doctor about these symptoms, and there is no evidence of a cardiac cause of the chest pain, you could be diagnosed as having some sort of disorder of the esophagus.
Peppermint can help with the difficulty swallowing and non-cardiac chest pain experienced by some patients with disorders of the esophagus, report investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) in Digestive Diseases & Sciences. Of the 38 patients enrolled in the MUSC pilot study, 63 percent overall reported improvement of symptoms. Patients were recruited from the Esophageal Disorders Clinic at the MUSC Health Digestive Disease Cent…

Antibiotic use linked to greater risk of heart attack and stroke in women

Women who take antibiotics over a long period of time are at increased risk of heart attack or stroke, according to research carried out in nearly 36,500 women. The study, published in the European Heart Journal [1] today (Thursday), found that women aged 60 or older who took antibiotics for two months or more had the greatest risk of cardiovascular disease, but long duration of antibiotic use was also associated with an increased risk if taken during middle age (aged 40-59). The researchers could find no increased risk from antibiotic use by younger adults aged between 20-39.
Professor Lu Qi, director of the Tulane University Obesity Research Centre, Tulane University, New Orleans, and adjunct professor of nutrition at Harvard T.C. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, USA, who led the research, says that a possible reason why antibiotic use is linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease is because antibiotics alter the balance of the micro-environment in the gu…

Despite health warnings, Americans still sit too much

Most Americans continue to sit for prolonged periods despite public health messages that such inactivity increases the risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers, according to a major new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
The research team analyzed surveys of 51,000 people from 2001 to 2016 to track sitting trends in front of TVs and computers and the total amount of time spent sitting on a daily basis. Unlike other studies that have looked at sedentary behaviors, the research is the first to document sitting in a nationally representative sample of the U.S. population across multiple age groups - from children to the elderly - and different racial and ethnic groups.
The research, led by Yin Cao, ScD, an epidemiologist and assistant professor of surgery in the Division of Public Health Sciences, is published April 23 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
"In almost n…

Number of women who aren't physically active enough is high and growing

Using data from a national survey representing more than 19 million U.S. women with established cardiovascular disease, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say that more than half of women with the condition do not do enough physical activity and those numbers have grown over the last decade. These results imply that targeted counseling to exercise more could reduce risk of cardiovascular disease as well as associated health care costs over their lifetimes.
The researchers say their results suggest that women diagnosed with such disorders as coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, heart rhythm disturbances and peripheral artery disease should talk to their physicians about how to increase their physical activity levels to maintain optimal cardiac health and decrease health care costs associated with cardiac disability.
According to the American Heart Association (AHA), heart disease remains the #1 killer of American women, 43 million of whom are…

Eating elderberries can help minimize influenza symptoms

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IMAGE: Black elderberry. view more 
Credit: Pixabay Folk medicines and herbal products have been used for millennia to combat a whole range of ailments, at times to the chagrin of modern scientists who have struggled to explain their medicinal benefits.
However a recent study by researchers at the University of Sydney has determined exactly how a popular ancient remedy, the elderberry fruit, can help the fight against influenza.
Conducted by Professor Fariba Deghani, Dr Golnoosh Torabian and Dr Peter Valtchev as part of the ARC Training Centre for the Australian Food Processing Industry that was established within the university's Faculty of Engineering and IT, the study showed that compounds from elderberries can directly inhibit the virus's entry and replication in human cells, and can help strengthen a person's immune response to the virus.
Although elderberry's flu-fighting properties have long been observed, the group performed …

Minor sleep loss can put your job at risk

Losing just 16 minutes of sleep could be the difference between a clear-headed day at the office or one filled with distractions.
A new study published in the Sleep Health (Journal of the National Sleep Foundation) finds shorting your sleep routine during the work-week greatly interferes with job performance. University of South Florida researchers found workers are more likely to have poor judgement and fall off-task the next day.
Lead author Soomi Lee, PhD, assistant professor in the School of Aging Studies, and her colleagues surveyed 130 healthy employees who work in Information Technology and have at least one school-aged child. Participants reported that when they slept 16 minutes less than usual and had worse quality sleep, they experienced more cognitive issues the next day. That raised their stress levels, especially regarding issues related to work-life balance, resulting in them going to bed earlier and waking up earlier due to fatigue.
"These cyclical…

Acupuncture equals disease prevention say new studies

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IMAGE: Medical Acupuncture, the Official Journal of the American Academy of Medical Acupuncture, presents evidence-based clinical articles, case reports, and research findings that integrate concepts from traditional and modern forms of... view more 
Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, April 23, 2019--Well-recognized for its therapeutic effects, acupuncture is increasingly being appreciated for its ability to promote wellness and contribute to the prevention of a broad range of conditions. A new study, which demonstrates the promise of acupuncture as a complementary approach in improving psychological and pain symptoms associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following a natural disaster, is published as part of a Special Issue on Acupuncture to Foster Health Promotion and Disease Prevention in Medical Acupuncture, a peer-reviewed journal from by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text article free o…

Nicotine replacement therapy

New evidence published in the Cochrane Library provides high quality evidence that people who use a combination of nicotine replacement therapies (a patch plus a short acting form, such as gum or lozenge) are more likely to successfully quit smoking than people who use a single form of the medicine.
Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is a medicine that is available as skin patches, chewing gum, nasal and oral sprays, inhalers, lozenges and tablets that deliver nicotine through the body to the brain. In many countries, people can get NRT from healthcare professionals as well as over-the-counter, without prescriptions. The aim of NRT is to replace the nicotine that people who smoke usually get from cigarettes, so the urge to smoke is reduced and they can stop smoking altogether. We know that NRT improves a person's chances of stopping smoking and that it's a popular choice for people who want to quit.
There are many different ways to use NRT. This Cochrane Review look…